wocinsolidarity:

Critics That ‘Orange is the New Black’ Can’t Win Over? The Formerly Incarcerated
“Orange is the New Black” had a big night at the Critics’ Choice Awards.
From E! Online:

The ladies of Orange Is the New Black walked away big winners tonight at the fourth annual 2014 Critics’ Choice TV Awards snagging Best Comedy Series, along with two more awards for Supporting Actress in a Comedy (Kate Mulgrew) and Guest Performer in a Comedy (Uzo Aduba). Aduba thanked OITNB showrunner Jenji Kohan “for changing my life.”

But if there’s at least one group of critics that the show can’t win over, it’s the formerly incarcerated. Adam Dawson of the Washington City Paper sat down and watched the first four episodes of season two with Sarah K., a white former heroin addict who spent more than four years in a Maryland state prison for armed robbery. Sarah remarks that the show nails the racist imbalance in sentencing laws:

Alex convinces Piper to lie on the witness stand. Alex then tells the truth when it’s her turn to testify. She is then apparently freed.
I’ll totally believe that.
Why?
Oh, people turn on each other constantly. All the time. And not even for getting released, you know? They do it for getting their sentence reduced by a few months. Anyone who tells you there’s this honor code, or thinks that their homeboys won’t rat them out is in for a rude awakening. But I’ll tell you the most believable thing about this whole series is the idea that Piper only got 15 months for running dope money.
Why is that believable?
Because she’s white, rich, and blonde.
Does that make a difference?
I’m a white blonde girl who went out and willfully fucked up and committed armed robbery, and I got five years. There were tons of black girls in my prison who were holding onto a bag of dope for a couple of days, and they always seemed to get, like, 10 years. If you ever find yourself in prison and wonder why there’s tension between white and black, shit like that is probably one of the reasons.
That’s incredibly unfair.
It absolutely is. But that didn’t prevent me from moonwalking the fuck out of that place when the time came.

But other things, like the kitchen and the playful banter with guards, are totally unrealistic. You can read more of her review here. And as for cheering for the show, Sarah makes it clear: “Its prison, dude. There’s nothing to cheer about.” 

wocinsolidarity:


Critics That ‘Orange is the New Black’ Can’t Win Over? The Formerly Incarcerated

“Orange is the New Black” had a big night at the Critics’ Choice Awards.

From E! Online:

The ladies of Orange Is the New Black walked away big winners tonight at the fourth annual 2014 Critics’ Choice TV Awards snagging Best Comedy Series, along with two more awards for Supporting Actress in a Comedy (Kate Mulgrew) and Guest Performer in a Comedy (Uzo Aduba). Aduba thanked OITNB showrunner Jenji Kohan “for changing my life.”

But if there’s at least one group of critics that the show can’t win over, it’s the formerly incarcerated. Adam Dawson of the Washington City Paper sat down and watched the first four episodes of season two with Sarah K., a white former heroin addict who spent more than four years in a Maryland state prison for armed robbery. Sarah remarks that the show nails the racist imbalance in sentencing laws:

Alex convinces Piper to lie on the witness stand. Alex then tells the truth when it’s her turn to testify. She is then apparently freed.

I’ll totally believe that.

Why?

Oh, people turn on each other constantly. All the time. And not even for getting released, you know? They do it for getting their sentence reduced by a few months. Anyone who tells you there’s this honor code, or thinks that their homeboys won’t rat them out is in for a rude awakening. But I’ll tell you the most believable thing about this whole series is the idea that Piper only got 15 months for running dope money.

Why is that believable?

Because she’s white, rich, and blonde.

Does that make a difference?

I’m a white blonde girl who went out and willfully fucked up and committed armed robbery, and I got five years. There were tons of black girls in my prison who were holding onto a bag of dope for a couple of days, and they always seemed to get, like, 10 years. If you ever find yourself in prison and wonder why there’s tension between white and black, shit like that is probably one of the reasons.

That’s incredibly unfair.

It absolutely is. But that didn’t prevent me from moonwalking the fuck out of that place when the time came.

But other things, like the kitchen and the playful banter with guards, are totally unrealistic. You can read more of her review here. And as for cheering for the show, Sarah makes it clear: “Its prison, dude. There’s nothing to cheer about.” 


i imagine that we are all kneeling on the floor together. all of us collectively keeping up this huge weight. but some of us don’t recognize the heaviness of it. or simply don’t care. and some of us feel it so much that we can barely keep our eyes open.


Despite claims that these radical policy changes were driven by fiscal conservatism- ie. the desire to end big government and slash budget deficits- the reality is that government was NOT reducing the amount of money devoted to the management of the urban poor. It was radically altering what the funds would be used for. The dramatic shift toward punitiveness resulted in a massive reallocation of public resources.

Funding that had once been used for public housing was being redirected to prison construction. During CLINTON’s tenure, Washington slashed funding for public housing by 17 billion and boosted corrections by 19 billion, effectively making the construction of prisons the nation’s main housing program for the urban poor.

CLINTON did not stop there. Determined to prove how “tough” he could be on “them,” CLINTON also made it easier for federally assisted public housing projects to exclude anyone with a criminal history - an extraordinarily harsh step in the midst of a drug war aimed at racial and ethnic minorities…thus for countless poor people, particularly racial minorities targeted by the drug war, public housing was no longer available, leaving many of them homeless- locked out of not only of mainstream society, but their own homes.

The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander

I guess what I’m trying to say is that the thing that breaks up bands is the same thing that drives creative work: We’re all working in a system that is inherently flawed. We’re all part of the capitalist structure where we’re being tempted, day in and day out, to give in to totally lame prizes. You can keep going and Adidas will pay for you to be in the background of their lame commercial. Or you can go participate in SXSW and if you’re lucky you’ll be the darling of that year. And a lot of people will take your photo, and maybe that will translate to record sales. You’ll feel good about yourself for a week. There are so many shallow rewards I will never condemn, because I’m a human being who likes to have my picture taken as long as I look good. But we are operating in that context and wondering about the greater picture, and wondering how we can talk to people about the things they’re wondering about when they’re falling asleep, or during their lunch break, or when they’re feeling sad for reasons they can’t understand. I think that’s the environment that Priests operates in. We exist in the contradiction of all of these things. We’re the bastard child of wanting to do the right thing in a world where the right thing doesn’t exist anymore.
Priests 


Many a time, I’ve been chilled to the spine
because I wanted you.
The Taxpayers

This too will pass. Four forty-five. Zig, zag. Tick. Tock. Sometimes bitterness makes a grab for Leah. Pulls her down, holds her. What was the point of it all? Three years of useless study. Out of pocket, out of her depth. It was only philosophy in the first place because she was scared of dying and thought it might help and because she could not add or draw or remember lists of facts or speak a language other than her own.In the university prospectus, an italic script over a picture of the Firth of Forth:
Philosophy is learning how to die.

Philosophy is listening to warbling posh boys, it is being more bored than you ever have been in your life, more bored than you thought it possible to be. It is wishing yourself anywhere else, in a different spot somewhere in the multiverse which is a concept you will never truly understand. In the end, only one idea reliably retained: time as a relative experience, different for the jogger, the lover, the tortured, the leisured. Like right now, when a minute seems to stretch itself into an hour. Otherwise, useless.

NW by Zadie Smith

powerecoads:

The Earth is not dying, it is being murdered.

powerecoads:

The Earth is not dying, it is being murdered.

(via theyoungradical)



reallifebfg:

georgeslays:

The reasons to love the British Royal family never end

It’s like they’re in a sitcom.

(via unwinona)